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Map the Meal Gap!

Map the Meal Gap Report


Hunger In America 2010: Numbers Served in State of Indiana 

• 694,500 different people served annually
• About 117,900 different people receive assistance in any given week

INDIANA SUMMARY REPORT

Hunger In America 2010: Key Findings for Gleaners Food Bank of Indiana
• 160,900 different people served annually
• About 33,600 different seek emergency food assistance in a given week
• Fully half of those served are among the most vulnerable members of our community: children and the elderly.
    o 43% of the members of households served by Gleaners are children under 18 years old
    o 7% of the members of households are seniors at least 65 years old
• 45% of clients are non-Hispanic white, 46% are non-Hispanic black, and 9% are Hispanic

Many Client Households are Food Insecure with Low or Very Low Food Insecurity
• 78 percent of client households served are food insecure, meaning they do not always know where they will find their next meal.  
• 39 percent of these client households are experiencing food insecurity with hunger, meaning they are sometimes completely without a source of food.
• Among households with children, 84% are food insecure and 33% are food insecure with hunger

Among the 160,900 people served by Gleaners Food Bank:
• 78 percent of households have incomes below the federal poverty line.
• The average monthly income for client households is $830.
• 35 percent of households have at least one employed adult.
• 10 percent of client households are homeless.

GLEANERS FOOD BANK OVERVIEW

Tough Choices
Many of the client households served by Gleaners Food Bank report that their household incomes are inadequate to cover their basic household expenses
.
• 45 percent of client households served report having to choose between paying for utilities or heating fuel and food.
• 41 percent of client households said they had to choose between paying for rent or a mortgage and food.
• 33 percent of client households report having to choose between paying for medical bills and food.
• 42 percent of client households must choose between transportation and food.
• 34% had to choose between paying for food and paying for gas for a car

Role of Federal Government
• 42 percent of client households are receiving SNAP (formerly food stamps) benefits; however, it is likely that many more are eligible.
• 45 percent of client households with children ages 0 to 3 participate in the WIC program.
• Among households with school-age children, 71% percent participate in the federal school lunch program and 70 percent participate in the school breakfast program.
• Among households with school-age children, 14% participate in the summer food program.

Agencies
• 70 percent of pantries, 58 percent of soup kitchens rely solely on volunteers and have no paid staff.
• 73% of pantries, 68% of kitchens, and 39% of shelters are run by faith-based agencies affiliated with churches,
  mosques, synagogues, and other religious organizations.
• Gleaners provides 61.5% of the food distributed by pantries, 41.3% of the food distributed by kitchens, and 32.8% of the food served by shelters.
• 84.0% of the pantries, 80.3% of the kitchens, and 67.9% of the shelters said that elimination of the food bank would have a significant or devastating impact on their operation.


NATIONAL PRESS RELEASE FEEDING AMERICA   (Word Document)

Hunger In America 2010: Key National Findings

Data collection in the first and second quarters of 2009
62,000 in-person interviews of clients served by the FA national network
37,000 surveys of emergency hunger relief agencies

• The 37 million Americans served annually by Feeding America include nearly 14 million children and nearly 3 million seniors. The total number of Americans served is a 46% increase over the numbers reported in Hunger in America 2006.

• Each week, approximately 5.7 million people receive emergency food assistance from an agency served by a Feeding America member. This is a 27 percent increase over numbers reported in Hunger in America 2006, which reported that 4.5 million people were served each week.

• These numbers are based on surveys conducted at emergency feeding centers, such as soup kitchens and food pantries, but do not factor in many individuals also served at non-emergency locations, such as Kids Cafe programs and senior centers.


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USDA’s Revised Labels Describe Ranges of Food Security

 

 

Old label

New label

Description of conditions in the household

Food security

High food security

No reported indications of food-access problems or limitations

Marginal food security

One or two reported indications—typically of anxiety over food sufficiency or shortage of food in the house. Little or no indication of changes in diets or food intake

Food insecurity without hunger

Low food security

Reports of reduced quality, variety, or desirability of diet. Little or no indication of reduced food intake

Food insecurity
with hunger

Very low food security

Reports of multiple indications of disrupted eating patterns and reduced food intake